Bigger isn’t better: The case for growing small marijuana plants

0
25
January
14,
2020




 
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cannabis growing, marijuana grow tips

(Elton
Clemente/AdobeStock)

We’re
not
going
to
delve
into
other
matters
where
this
might
be
up
for
debate,
but
when
it
comes
to
cannabis,
bigger
doesn’t
mean
better.
Sure,
giant
weed
plants
look
really
cool.
If
nothing
else,
it’s
ridiculously
impressive
that
a
warm
season
annual
can
go
from
seed
to
tree-sized
in
a
matter
of
months.
We
get
it.


But
when
it
comes
to
the
actual
growing,
drying,
flavor,
and
quality
of
your
crop,
don’t
be
suckered
into
thinking
that
size
is
everything.
In
fact,
we
have
solid
reasons
to
encourage
you
to
embrace
smaller
plants
in
your
garden.


Nosy
neighbors
can’t
see
them


No
matter
the
size,
your
neighbors
might
be
able
to
smell
the
goods
from
over
the
fence.
But
you’ll
keep
your
garden
much
less
conspicuous
by
growing
plants
on
the
smaller
side.
While
weed
cultivation
might
be
legal
in
your
state,
we’re
still
operating
in
a
grey
area
due
to
federal
illegality.


If
someone’s
got
a
vendetta
against
you,
you’re
just
better
off
not
having
weed
plants
towering
above
fences
and
in
plain
sight.
And
besides
revenge
seekers,
there
are
people
who
might
be
tempted
to
steal
your
crop
if
you’re
making
it
too
easy
for
them.


They’re
much
easier
to
care
for


The
best
method
of
pest
control
always
starts
with
you
giving
your
plants
a
once
over.
That’s
quite
easy
to
do
when
plants
are
on
the
smaller
side.
You
can
reach
up
or
kneel
down,
walk
around
your
plant,
and
give
every
leaf
and
bud
an
inspection,
usually
without
breaking
a
sweat
or
taking
all
day.


Things
get
a
little
more
complicated
when
you
need
a
ladder
to
do
the
same
thing.
Not
only
do
you
open
the
door
to
injury
from
falling,
but
it’ll
take
much
more
time
when
you’ve
grown
giant
plants.
You’ll
likely
skip
the
task
entirely,
opening
the
door
for
pest
problems
to
get
out
of
control.


Small
buds
are
easier
to
dry


Massive
buds
definitely
look
cool,
but
it
can
be
a
headache
to
try
and
dry
them
properly.
A
tasty,
usable
crop
depends
on
buds
drying
evenly
from
the
outside
in
and
inside
out.
This
is
a
much
more
reasonable
task
if
buds
are
a
manageable
size.
Once
they
feel
dry
from
the
outside,
a
few
days
of
burping
them
in
a
storage
vessel
will
suck
out
the
remaining
moisture.


Bigger
buds
are
more
difficult.
Even
when
you
think
buds
are
dry
on
the
outside,
they
might
be
packing
quite
a
punch
of
moisture
on
the
inside.
Not
only
will
curing
be
much
more
of
an
artform
and
take
much
longer,
you’re
much
likelier
to
end
up
with
mold
problems.


It
will
likely
taste
better


If
you’re
not
sold
yet,
this
one
will
get
you:
The

Emerald
Cup

judges
often
hand
out
awards
to
buds
coming
from
plants
that
yield
less
than
two
pounds.
Simply
put,
smaller
plants
can
produce
better
tasting
weed.


Think
about
it:
A
plant’s
goal
in
life
is
to
reproduce.
If
it’s
stressed
in
any
way,
it
abandons
unnecessary
tasks
(like
packing
on
extra
foliage)
and
focuses
everything
on
reproduction.
That’s
why
you
hear
so
much
about
mouthwatering
dry-farmed
tomatoes
or
grapes.
The
harvest
might
be
smaller,
both
in
fruit
size
and
yield,
but
the
taste
is
unbeatable,
as
stressed
out
plants
pour
everything
they’ve
got
into
their
fruit,
flowers,
or
seeds.


In
the
case
of
weed,
that
means
stickier
buds
loaded
with
terpenes
and
packed
with
cannabinoids.
Don’t
take
our
word
for
it—Happy
Dreams
Farm,

Eel
River
Farms
,
and
High
Water
Farm
are
just
a
few
of
the
Humboldt-area
spots
having
great
success
with
dry-farmed
weed.
Their
plants
are
itty
bitty
and
tasty
as
hell.


Not
shooting
for
massive
weed
also
bodes
well
for
the
environment
as
well
as
your
pocketbook.
You
can
skip
the
heavy
doses
of
fertilizers
in
the
false
thinking
that
bigger
weed
yields
tastier
plants.
What
you
want
to
do
is
a
lot
simpler
and
a
lot
less
expensive.


When
you
first
plant
your
weed
outdoors,
make
sure
the
soil
is
amended
with
plenty
of
quality,
finished
compost.
Truth
be
told,
that’s
likely
all
your
weed
needs
for
the
growing
season.
It’ll
be
just
enough
to
get
the
plant
growing
nicely,
and
not
too
much
nourishment
for
the
plant
to
get
lazy
about
flavor.



 
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Johanna Silver's Bio Image

Johanna
Silver

Johanna
Silver
is
the
former
Garden
Editor
of
Sunset
Magazine.
She
lives
with
her
husband
and
young
son
in
Berkeley,
CA.
In
her
garden
she
grows
fruits,
veggies,
a
little
weed,
and
as
many
cut
flowers
as
she
can
possibly
fit.

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